“The Holy Spirit and Us”: Reaching Dallas Through Spirit-Filled Community

Since All Saints Dallas was founded in 2010, Alpha courses have played an integral part in helping people find community, welcome, and hospitality. For the last few years, Father Jay Wright has led the Alpha program with good humor and a servant’s heart. In preparation to lead a church plant in East Dallas, Wright has handed over leadership to Father Dave Larlee. We recently sat down with Fr. Larlee to ask about the transition of leadership and why Alpha is…

Old Texts and New Tunes: A Songwriting Retreat with United Adoration

In the second weekend of June, a casual observer at All Saints Dallas might have noticed different songs coming from nearly every room – new and intriguing songs whose words seemed oddly familiar. This mix of strangeness and familiarity is fairly normal at United Adoration’s songwriters’ retreats, like the one held at All Saints this summer. United Adoration (UA) is an ecumenical collective that brings together songwriters who desire to create and release fresh music for the liturgical church. Each year…

Mozart’s Secret to Living the Easter Life

We’ve celebrated Easter—now what? The Rev. Brad Mathias of Four Winds Mission shares how Mozart discovered an insight that allowed him to fully embrace life.  I recently heard a great sermon on XM Radio’s family talk channel. The preacher shared about Mozart, who was quoted at one time to say…“The secret to life is accepting death” (my paraphrase). The story goes that Mozart attributed his amazing life of musical genius and prolific creativity to the understanding that he would die, could die, at any time, and he was completely surrendered…

Rethinking Slothfulness

Can a busy, productive person also be a sloth? In the fourth post in a Lenten series on the seven deadly sins, Lucas Damoff contends that extreme busyness—rather than rest—is a sign of real slothfulness.  A mentor of mine, who was a long time pastor, once told me a story from a time he went to a pastor’s conference. In the course of conversation a group of pastors began talking about the last time they had been able to take a Sabbath rest. For…

A Hidden Leprosy of the Heart

In the third post in our Lenten series on the seven deadly sins, the Rev. David Larlee tackles the insidious nature of greed.  Take some time to read 2 Kings 5:1-27, if you haven’t lately. It is the gripping account of a Syrian General healed by an Israeli Holy Man (at least that’s how it would be reported today). On the one hand, we have a man journeying toward God’s grace and on the other, we have a man journeying toward…

The Most/Least Popular Sin

Lucas Damoff investigates the attitude of gluttony in the second post of a Lenten series examining the seven deadly sins. In 2013, the French electronica duo Daft Punk released a trailer for their upcoming album at the Coachella music festival. Anticipation was high, as they had not released any new material since 2005. The story goes that Guy Manuel de Homem-Christo and Thomas Bangalter, the members of the duo, looked on in amusement as the main stage crowd went wild at the first few snippets of sound….

The Tinfoil Kingdom of Lust

The Rev. Gavin Pate writes the first in a series of blogs examining the seven deadly sins. During Lent, we are exploring how God’s grace confronts and conquers our sin.  “Adam and his wife were both naked, and they felt no shame.” –Genesis 2:25 As individuals, they bore the image of God. Together, they were a perfect picture of Trinitarian love. Then, the great act of disobedience, animating the reality of what was in the heart. Shame is present. Nakedness is no longer…

Between Two Traditions: Anglican Views on Holy Communion

Catholics and Evangelicals serve as bookends to an Anglican stance on Holy Communion. The Rev. Gavin Pate of All Saints Dallas explores why Anglicans take a comparatively high view of the sacrament but cheerfully vary on the particulars.  Some friends of ours had a chance to visit Rome last year.  While there, they attended a Eucharistic Adoration service.  In this service, the host (the large piece of bread used in Holy Communion) was placed in a glass box.  This glass box was placed in the center of the altar…

The Via Media and the Muddled Middle

Via media is Latin for “the middle road,” and for years, this concept has been instrumental in shaping the Anglican identity. Find out why the Rev. Chris Myers of All Saints Dallas considers the perspective both a blessing and a curse. For me, the via media is a way of saying that Anglicans are attempting to practice a Reformed Catholicism. We can think of this in geographic terms, where Canterbury, Anglicanism, occupies the territory between Geneva and Rome, between Calvinism and Catholicism where Canterbury is not a…

Spiritual Gifts: A Missional Exercise in Grace and Dependence

In the sixth post in our Foundations series, the Rev. Seth Richardson of St. Andrew’s Little Rock reveals why spiritual gifts are essential to mission—and just how we can go about discerning and exercising them.  One of the most important things we can do as society that desires to be on mission making disciples is cultivate space for discerning and exercising the spiritual gifts as a regular,  foundational practice among our entire community. Cultivating this space helps form our community into disciple-makers,…